Freezer Friendly Caponata

 

Credit: Dreamlight Studios, Palm Beach Gardens

 

During the Kai Kai Dinner we also shared a savory dish with you called Caponata. This recipe best captures what the essence of a Caponata is. I also especially like that it is almost a no-oil recipe and comes the closest to how I like to cook these days.  Eggplant is a sponge that unnecessarily soaks up a ton of oil, taking a healthy dish right into unhealthy territory.

Grill it dry instead, then add it to all the other stew ingredients.  Let it soak up the juices of those other glorious vegetables.  Anything sautéed in oil can be sautéed in vegetable stock instead. That’s a technique called “braising”.   It’s a thing, yes.

If your tomatoes are sweet enough, you won’t need any sugar, not even a pinch, and most traditional recipes will add in a few water-soaked raisins towards the last stage of cooking. They’re missing here, but feel free to add those and some fresh lemon zest too.  Try golden or green colored raisins, aka “sultanas” for a pop of flavor, and color.

Once it’s made, consider having this with salad greens, and it can also accompany cooked pasta and/or cooked garbanzo beans for a complete meal.

A most authentic garnish is a few toasted pignoli nuts and make this at least a day in advance, giving all the ingredients’ flavors time to meld and marry.

**BONUS TIP**Since this freezes and reheats so well, make a double batch and enjoy in many different ways, some now, some later. Enjoy!

Our recipe is similar to the one below however, we gathered our inspiration and then took creative liberties but we would like to give credit where credit is do so please enjoy the recipe and feel free to share how yours turned out below!

Caponata 

by MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN

Time: 1 hour, plus 1 hour’s optional refrigeration

Yield: Serves 6 to 8

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016445-caponata

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 1/2 pounds eggplant (1 large), roasted
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, from the inner, tender stalks (the heart), diced
  • 3 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 red bell peppers, diced
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 pound ripe tomatoes, preferably romas, peeled, seeded and finely chopped, or 1 14-ounce can crushed tomatoes (in puree)
  • 3 heaped tablespoons capers, rinsed and drained
  • 3 tablespoons coarsely chopped pitted green olives
  • 2 tablespoons plus a pinch of sugar
  • 3 tablespoons red or white wine vinegar or sherry vinegar (more to taste)
  • freshly ground pepper to taste

 

We would love to know below what you did differently or if you enjoyed this dish!

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Our Muse Behind the Kai Kai Farm Dinner

Credit: (Left) Leah Christians, (Right) Dreamlight Studios, Palm Beach Gardens

Our Dinner at Kai Kai Farm drew much inspiration from various places. In the Mediterranean south of France, “Socca” is street food, much like a crepe is in Paris. It’s taken a few decades, but crepes are now easily found at street fairs and festivals, even little shops across America. Perhaps we can make this Socca, or “farinata” equally ubiquitous in the USA, in the near future. It’s delicious, keeps well and overall, is hard to screw up.

It’s a simple garbanzo bean flour batter, spiked with olive oil, herbs or spices, and salt. The key is that it’s baked in a very hot pan, or oven. I used a smoking hot cast iron pan, poured the batter in a thin layer, swirled the pan to roll the batter evenly, making an ideal crepe, complete with crispy edges. These are golden, savory, gluten free-goodness, worthy of any bread eater!

Credit: Dreamlight Studios, Palm Beach Gardens

Try stuffing a full size pancake with sautéed veggies, quinoa and fresh Avocado for a delish treat! You can make the batter ahead of time and store it, refrigerated in a glass jar. The Socca, once made, also stores, keeps and reheats well.

If you’d prefer a thicker version, more like a flatbread, try this Ligurian based recipe.
**Bonus**: it comes with nutritional information, too!

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1014757-socca-farinata

Either way, you’re In for a very earthy, comforting, and satisfying treat.

The Main Course during our Dinner at Kai Kai Farm was a Caponata made with Eggplant, tomatoes and other vegetables similar to a Ratatouille! Head on over to that post for the recipe for Caponata!

We would love to know below what you did differently or if you enjoyed this dish!

Make sure you connect with us online on Facebook, and Instagram